Interracial Marriage Becoming the Norm in U.S.: Report

Interracial marriage is on the rise, making more than a fivefold increase since 1967, when only 3 percent of newlyweds were intermarried, according to a Pew Research Center report released Thursday. However, interracial marriage is more accepted by Democrats than Republicans, and Black men and Asian women are more likely to marry someone of a different race.


In 2015, 17 percent of all newlyweds in the country had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity the growth coinciding “with shifting societal norms as Americans have become accepting of marriages involving spouses of different races and ethnicities, even within their own families,” according to the report.

The 17 percent represents one-in-six newlyweds, while, more broadly, among all married people in 2015, one-in-10, about 11 million,were intermarried, according to Pew.

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